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The United States Isn’t Doomed to Lose the Information Wars

China and Russia are ramping up their disinformation campaigns in the lead-up to the November vote. It’s time for Washington to fight back.

Voters line-up to cast their ballots at a polling station set up at Noonday Baptist Church for the mid-term elections on November 6, 2018 in Marietta, Georgia.

Americans Are Officially Giving Up on Democracy

New polling shows that a growing share of U.S. citizens want leaders who wouldn’t “bother with” elections.

A view of the construction site of Turkey's first nuclear power plant, Akkuyu, pictured during the opening ceremony in the Mediterranean Mersin region on April 3, 2018.

To Prevent Proliferation, Stop Enrichment and Reprocessing in the Middle East

There is a risk of a nuclear cascade across the region. The United States can stop it by enforcing the gold standard of nonproliferation.

A burned-out Armenian Army BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicle

No, Drones Haven’t Made Tanks Obsolete

Wrecked armor in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict was down to bad training and terrain, not magical technology.

Abandoned machinery in Pulacayo, a former mining center in Bolivia

Clean Energy Can’t Have Dirty Roots

Securing human rights in the supply chain of critical minerals is vital for a green future.

A “misinformation newsstand” aiming to educate voters about disinformation ahead of the 2018 U.S. midterm elections as seen in Manhattan on Oct. 30, 2018.

Forget Counterterrorism, the United States Needs a Counter-Disinformation Strategy

If the U.S. government wants to win the information wars, Cold War-era tactics won’t cut it anymore.

Palestinians gather to commemorate the Second Intifada and to protest the Israeli normalization deals in the occupied West Bank on Sept. 28.

What Normalization?

How Israel’s agreements this year with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates made the Middle East more volatile.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wears a protective face covering as he arrives at the BBC in central London on Oct. 4.

Deal or No Deal Is No Longer the Point

The United Kingdom is heading for a “hard Brexit” no matter what. Here’s why—and what it means for the country’s economy.

A power plant in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah.

Iraq’s Future Isn’t Oil, It’s Sustainable Electricity

As the country continues to grapple with the aftermath of the Islamic State insurgency, revolutionizing the country’s energy sector could be the key to long-term security.

A pedestrian walks by a mural that says “I Love Guam” in Tamuning, Guam, on Aug. 14, 2017.

Counter China by Making Guam a State

More than a partisan move, statehood would be a foreign-policy masterstroke.

An unexploded BM-30 Smerch missile is seen on the outskirts of Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, on Oct. 12.

Tehran’s Worst Nightmare

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict could spill over to Iran’s Azeri minority, setting off a battle the government can’t contain.

A handout picture provided by the Iranian Army's official website on Sept. 11 shows an Iranian Simorgh drone carrying a weapon during a military exercise in near the Strait of Hormuz.

A Partial Ban on Autonomous Weapons Would Make Everyone Safer

Great powers stand to lose the most from weapons like drone swarms and should back a limited ban on the most dangerous systems.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gives a speech during a press conference at the end of a meeting with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing on Sept. 6, 2019.

Merkel’s China Reset Is Mostly Hollow

Washington shouldn’t expect—and may not need—a coordinated policy with Berlin.

Riot police detain protesters at a march in Belarus on Oct. 11.

Lukashenko’s Talk Offers Could Trap Him or Protesters

The besieged autocrat is stuck between Russia and a hard place.

U.S. President Donald Trump on the Truman Balcony of the White House after returning from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5 in Washington, DC.

Investors Are Already Treating America Like an Emerging Market

Election chaos, social unrest, and weak institutions make the United States too risky for a developed economy.

Russian matryoshka dolls depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump on sale at in Moscow on July 13, 2018.

America Must Promote Democracy, Despite Trump’s Disdain for It

Even if 2020 marks a low point of U.S. democratic practice, supporting liberalism abroad must remain a vital element of U.S. foreign policy.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews, some wearing face masks, pray during the Sukkot holiday at the Western Wall in the old city of Jerusalem, on Oct. 7 amid Israel's second coronavirus lockdown.

The Government Can’t Save Ultra-Orthodox Jews From COVID-19. Religious Leaders Can.

The coronavirus has hit Haredi enclaves hard, but without clear directives from rabbis, isolated communities from Jerusalem to New York will continue to suffer.

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive for the state dinner with China's President Xi Jinping and China's first lady Peng Liyuan

Beijing Believes Trump Is Accelerating American Decline

Public intelligence assessments of China’s 2020 election preferences only tell half the story.

Young Pakistani youths hold national flags during a cycling competition near the Pakistan-China border on June 30, 2019.

Pakistan Is Doing Its Own Political Reengineering in Kashmir

After condemning New Delhi for its machinations in Jammu and Kashmir, Islamabad is quietly changing the status of Gilgit-Baltistan on its side of the Line of Control.

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The Case for Climate Reparations

The world’s poorest will bear the worst consequences of the climate crisis. Redirecting international resources to address entrenched inequalities provides a way out.

The Chinese-funded Colombo Port City project is seen jutting into the ocean in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Nov. 8, 2018.

China’s Belt and Road Initiative Is a Mess, Not a Master Plan

Beijing’s foreign investments are often money-losing and driven by recipients’ own agendas.

Paramilitary police march near the U.S. consulate in Chengdu, China.

COVID-19 Might Not Change the World

Pandemics are not always transformative events. While some worrying preexisting trends could accelerate, it’s incorrect to assume that the coronavirus will end globalization, kill liberal democracy, or enhance China’s soft power.

Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan gives an interview in Yerevan on Oct. 6.

Without Russian Aid to Armenia, Azerbaijan Has the Upper Hand in Nagorno-Karabakh

Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan has overplayed his hand by spouting belligerent nationalist rhetoric and refusing to negotiate—and Putin isn’t coming to his rescue.

Working in bipartisan pairs, canvassers process mail-in ballots in a warehouse at the Anne Arundel County Board of Elections headquarters in Glen Burnie, Maryland, on Oct. 7.

Why We Still Need Democracy

Imperfect as electoral systems are, they provide a vital accountability.

The interior of an NHS 111 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pod

How Not to Kill People With Spreadsheets

The U.K. government’s disastrous coronavirus error is another example of outsourcing gone wrong.

A woman carries a diabled man wearing a protective face mask the Sabra neighbourhood of Beirut where many Palestinian refugees still live, amid measures coordinated with Palestinian security forces to shut down all shops in a bid to limit the spread of COVID-19 coronavirus disease, on March 22, 2020.

Coronavirus Is Pushing Lebanon Over the Brink

It’s time to add an uncontrolled outbreak to the country’s long list of woes.

Members of the Islamic State stand alongside their weapons, following their surrender to Afghanistan's government in Jalalabad on Nov. 17, 2019.

Indians and Central Asians Are the New Face of the Islamic State

Terrorists from India, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan were never at the forefront of global jihad before—now they are.

Marine Le Pen shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron after their meeting at the Elysée palace in Paris, on Nov. 21, 2017.

Macron’s Not Worried About Islam. He’s Worried About Le Pen.

The French president’s talk of a crisis among French Muslims is the latest example of mainstream politicians pandering to the far-right. ?

French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech during a trip on the theme of the republican reconquest and the fight against Islamist separatism at the Dollar gymnasium in Mulhouse, eastern France, on Feb. 18, 2020.

Macron Wants to Start an Islamic Revolution

The French president is planning to curb the influence of extremist clerics—but his critics see something more sinister.

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